New Microsoft 365 Groups governance content

Microsoft recently refreshed its Microsoft 365 Groups governance content on docs.microsoft.com – something that was very timely as the amount of confusion that still exists around Groups.

I was engaged to review a bunch of the content and make suggestions/recommendations on where it might need to be corrected or updated, but additionally I authored a couple of docs that are now available.

End of lifecycle options for Microsoft 365 Groups

The first one is around a topic that is not fully understood by many, especially end users: your options when it’s time for the Group to be put to rest.

There are a number of services associated with Groups – not just a Team with its channels or SharePoint site with its document library. I often hear horror stories from users and IT pros who deleted a Team or Group and too late realised that there was something in the Planner that they wanted to refer to, a results in a Form that needed to be shared. Depending when the Group was deleted, options at this point are limited.

Writing this doc was quite cathartic, as it allowed me to really explain a topic as well as research some of the areas I wasn’t as familiar with (such as Project). Initially it was supposed to be 1,500 words but ended up being about 3,000 because there was just so much to cover.

You can view it online here.

The interaction between Microsoft 365 workloads and Groups

Building on the previous section, how various Microsoft 365 workloads interact with Microsoft 365 Groups is mind-boggling. This too was a cathartic process as it allowed me to explain an even more misunderstood topic.

Matt Wade has a fantastic guide to Groups that I refer to (with attribution) on a regular basis, however there’s still some gaps and products that aren’t referred to.

Similarly to the previous doc, this too was supposed to be 1,500 words but ended up being 4,000 words!

You can view it online here.

Authors note: a product feature changed a week after this was accepted and put into the publishing machine, so needs to be updated.

When To Do worlds collide (with OneNote)

For many years in the OneNote desktop client (i.e. 2013, 2016, not “OneNote for Windows 10”) we have a “To Do” tag that appeared in the ribbon:

But what does it do? Not much, just a nice little checkbox:

That checkbox is literally nothing more than a tag that can be used for searching, and a visual queue. The most excitement this little feature gets is when you check the box:

And for many years that’s been just fine, as savvy users of OneNote would use these tags (and others) to filter and find notes across pages, sections, and even notebooks.

Wait, this isn’t the same as Microsoft To Do?

No, it’s not. This is Microsoft To Do:

It’s a task management app, available both free for consumer users of Outlook.com as well as organisational Office 365 users.

To Do differs between the free vs. business/education Office 365 versions. In the latter it can connect to Planner, Microsoft Teams, Outlook email, calendar and tasks.

However, Microsoft To Do has absolutely nothing to do with the “To Do” tag in OneNote despite using the same capitalisation. This is important to note because for many people they would only be discovering OneNote now (despite the fact it’s over 15 years old) as well as Microsoft To Do, and potentially getting confused by this feature that appears not to work properly.

Is there a connection at all?

Yes, like a bizarre love triangle there is a connection between OneNote, Outlook, and To Do.

In the world of Office 365, Microsoft To Do relies on Outlook as its underlying storage service. In fact, tasks in To Do are actually tasks in Outlook. Go on, dust off the tasks button in Outlook and have a look – you’ll see all your tasks from To Do.

When using Outlook on the web, the tasks button has been replaced with both the To Do icon and functionality. The integration is strong, in that flagged emails in Outlook show up in a dedicated folder in To Do. As well as this, users can drag emails into To Do to turn them into tasks and drag tasks into their Outlook calendar to turn them into appointments. Very cool stuff. You can read more about the functionality here.

The connection between Outlook and OneNote has been strong for quite some time (but not the “OneNote for Windows 10” version – that can’t connect to Outlook). In OneNote we can link to Outlook calendar appointments, and from appointments we can link to either our own area of OneNote or a shared location for a meeting. You can read more about this functionality here, and here respectively.

However, there’s another linkage of OneNote that only power users have taken advantage of – and that’s the ability to create Outlook tasks from OneNote. Let’s look back at the ribbon in OneNote and we can see our friend Wally hiding in plain sight:

If we use this button on a line in a OneNote page, we should see a flag show up at the start of that line, as can be seen in the second line of this image:

So where does this task go? If we have a look at the tasks area in Outlook, I can now see this:

The linkage isn’t one way though, if I mark the task as complete in Outlook it will update in OneNote too:

You can read more about this functionality here.

But wait, there’s more!!! The triquetra between OneNote and To Do with Outlook in the middle gives us this:

If we mark this task complete in To Do, it will update in Outlook tasks (because that’s where it’s stored) and therefore update in OneNote!

It’s not all happy endings

If you’re a savvy To Do user, then you probably have multiple task lists – not just the main Tasks folder. So, it seems quite reasonable that you’d want to move the task from this folder into one of your other task lists.

Let’s create a new task in OneNote:

Let’s verify that it’s there in Outlook:

And in To Do:

I’ve moved it into a different task list:

The change is reflected in the “In Folder” column in Outlook tasks:

But something happens in OneNote:

Hey… the colour is different.

It looks a bit pale.

Is it unwell?

Yes, yes it is. Hovering over the pale flag, a message shows up:

Wait what!? This is a little confusing because we confirmed that the task is still visible in Outlook, so why is OneNote saying it can’t see it?

Unfortunately, I don’t have the answer. All I’ve been able to demonstrate in this blog post is that we can connect between the three apps, and while the changes we make in the To Do and Outlook worlds don’t seem to make much difference, the connection to the origin in OneNote is broken.